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Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society

The Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, established in 1908, is the scholarly publication of the Illinois State Historical Society. The peer-reviewed Journal welcomes articles, essays, and documents about history, literature, art technology, law, and other subjects related to Illinois and the Midwest.

The Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society is published quarterly and is available to everyone for purchase, discounts are included for members of the Illinois State Historical Society. Visit our Membership section for membership options and information.

To purchase individual issues please contact our office.

Volume 110 - Number 3-4 - Fall/Winter 2017

Volume 110 - Number 3-4 - Fall/Winter 2017

Volume 110 - Number 3-4 - Fall/Winter 2017

VOLUME 110 NOS 3-4 OF THE JOURNAL features a collection of seven essays in honor of the Illinois statehood bicentennial in 2018 written by both emerging and seasoned scholars.  Christopher Schnell looks at very early Illinois legal history and the conflict of opinions on the nature of property law between lawyers and squatters in "Lawyers, Squatters, and the Transformation of the Public Domain in Early-Statehood Illinois."  In ""You have been the soldiers friend or we dare not appeal to you": The Papers of Illinois Governor Richard Yates as a Window on Civil War Medicine," Glena Schroeder-Lein examines the medical concerns of Illinois soldiers and their loved ones as representative of civil war care generally.  In "Fields of Battle:  The Problem of Base Ball Playing Space in Post-Civil War Illinois," Robert Sampson studies comparative urban dynamics in the 1860's as the leaders of Springfield and Bloomington determined, in contrasting ways, where the sport could be played in their cities.  David Joens's study of Illinois' colored conventions in the 1880's titled "Illinois Colored Conventions of 1880s," determines them to have been more successful than previous African American conventions in the state.  Moving into the twentieth century, Denise Johnson in, "Central Illinois Women Who Served in the Military During World War II," uses interviews with eight central Illinois women to recount not only their experiences in the World War II military experiences, but also the life-long importance to them of work.  Mark DePue traces the development of sentiment for the 1980s constitutional amendment to reduce the size of the Illinois legislature through the abolition of cumulative voting in, "The Cutback Amendment of 1980: Unintended Consequences of Pat Quinn's Reforming Zeal".  Lastly, Robert Hartley in, "Alan Dixon and Paul Simon:  Like Brothers, They Did Not Always Agree or Win," examines the friendship of two very different Illinois politicians. 

Purposefully excluded from this issue are essays on Abraham Lincoln.  The shadow of Lincoln often dominates the history of his adopted state.  For that reason, we wanted to give a taste of other topics that have been studied less often. 

Articles 

"Lawyers, Squatters, and the Transformation of the Public Domain in Early-Statehood Illinois"
Christopher Schnell

""You have been the soldiers friend or we dare not appeal to you": The Papers of Illinois Governor Richard Yates as a Window on Civil War Medicine"
Glena Schroeder-Lein 

"Fields of Battle:  The Problem of Base Ball Playing Space in Post-Civil War Illinois" 
Robert Sampson

"Illinois Colored Conventions of 1880s"
David Joens

"Central Illinois Women Who Served in the Military During World War II" 
Denise R. Johnson

"The Cutback Amendment of 1980: Unintended Consequences of Pat Quinn's Reforming Zeal"
Mark R. DePue

"Alan Dixon and Paul Simon:  Like Brothers, They Did Not Always Agree or Win"
Robert E. Hartley 

Book Reviews

The Borderland of Fear:  Vincennes, Prophetstown, and the Invasion of the Miami Homeland. By Patrick Bottiger
Reviewed by Robert McColley

Home Rule: Households, Manhood, and National Expansion on the Eighteenth-Century Kentucky Frontier. By Honor Sachs
Reviewed by Michael C. Batinski 

Bison and People on the North American Great Plains: A Deep Enviromental History. Ed. by Geoff Cunfer and Bill Waiser
Reviewed By Alexander Finkelstein

Women, Work, and Worship in Lincoln's Country:  The Dunville Family Letters.  Ed. by Anne M. Heinz and John P. Heinz
Reviewed by Debra A. Reid

Slavery on the Periphery: The Kansas-Missouri Border in the Antebellum and Civil War Years. By Kirsten Epps
Reviewed by Jeanne McDonald

Bloomer Girls:  Women Baseball Pioneers. By Debra A. Shattuck
Reviewed by Cate Liabraaten

Reverend Addie Wyatt: Faith and the Fight for Labor, Gender, and Racial Equality. By Marcia Walker-McWilliams
Reviewed by Amy Helene Forss

Waiting for Buddy Guy:  Chicago Blues at the Crossroads.  By Alan Harper
Reviewed by Steve Shanley

Painting the Gospel: Black Public Art and Religion in Chicago. By Kymberly N. Pinder 
Reviewed by Jennifer Rose Hasso 

Fit for the Presidency?  Winners, Losers, What-Ifs, and Also-Rans. By Seymour Morris, Jr.
Reviewed by John Morello
  
 

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Previous Issue Volume 110 - Number 2 - Summer 2017
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