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Thursday, October 18, 2018

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March - April 2018

Volume 21, Number 2

Elaine Evans 0 483 Article rating: No rating
This March–April issue of Illinois Heritage highlights the recognition of thirty Illinois churches and synagogues that have been in continuous fellowship for 150 years or more. Currently, more than 200 churches and synagogues have been recognized by the ISHS.

The Bicentennial Year is well underway with many special events planned by local historical societies, libraries, government agencies and other community organizations. As an individual, consider reading one or more books listed in the Illinois Classics: A Bicentennial Reading List, a twelve-month reading list that includes novels, nonfictional works, and poetry, all by Illinois authors and expressive of the Illinois experience. 

This issue expresses not only the variety of interests in the state, but what is important at different periods in our state’s history.

Volume 110 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

Mark Hubbard 0 2265 Article rating: No rating
VOLUME 110 OF THE JOURNAL opens with three studies of post–
World War II Illinois history. In “‘Names and Appearances are often Inde-
terminate:’ Quandaries over Identifying Jews in Chicago, 1953–1961,” Kelly
King-O’Brien examines the conversations between Chicago-based Jewish
agencies, President Eisenhower’s Committee on Government Contracts
(PCGC), and private employers accused of discriminatory practices. 
Ann Durkin Keating treats another facet of civic life that shaped the
postwar liberal order in “‘Behind the Suburban Curtain:’ The Campaign
for Open Occupancy in Naperville.” In our final article, “‘ The Dwindling
Legacy that is Food for Mice and Flames:’ Discovery and Preservation
of Illinois Historic Newspapers through the Illinois Digital Newspaper
Project, 2009–2015,” Marek Sroka and Tracy Nectoux trace the history
of newspaper preservation in Illinois up through our current digital age.  


Volume 109 – Number 3 – Fall 2016

Mark Hubbard 0 2997 Article rating: No rating
This issue offers three articles covering diverse aspects of Illinois' history. In "Illinois Germans and the Coming of the Civil War: Reshaping Ethnic Identity," Christina Bearden-White uses German-language sources to examine the complex issue of German identity in the Prairie State during the mid-nineteenth century. Ian Rocksborough-Smith's article, "'I had gone in there thinking I was going to be a cultural worker': Richard Durham, Oscar Brown, Jr. and the United Packinghouse Workers Association in Chicago," presents a fascinating analysis of the Cold War-era careers of Oscar Brown, Jr. and Richard Durham, two prominent Chicago-based African American political activists. Finally, Michael Sublett's "Downstate: Illinois' Peripheral Other," presents the etymology of that well-known Prairie State term. Employing the categories of core and periphery, which rose to prominence in social science and historical writing during the 1970s, Sublett traces the evolution and application of the downstate moniker.
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