Search
Sunday, May 20, 2018

Newsroom

Downstate Illinois

Volume 110 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

Mark Hubbard 0 968 Article rating: No rating
VOLUME 110 NO. 2 OF THE JOURNAL opens with three studies that about events that dramatically shaped the state’s nearly two hundred year history. In Pocahontas, Uleleh, and Hononegah: The Archetype of the American Indian Princess, Dan Blumlo explores the trope of the Indian Princess– who intervenes at a crucial moment to save a white man from certain death at the hands of savage Indians– evolved and became central to nineteenth and twentieth century conceptions of American nationalism. In Jim Crow Comes to Central Illinois: Racial Segregation in the twentieth Century Bloomington-Normal, Mark Wyman and John W. Muirhead review the persistence of racial segregation in Illinois and the struggles of blacks and sympathetic whites to combat it. In our final article, The Decline of Decatur, longtime Illinois historian Roger Biles presents a timely account of what we today call globalization, and why its history matters so much to residents of countless Rustbelt cities like Decatur.

Volume 109 – Number 3 – Fall 2016

Mark Hubbard 0 2136 Article rating: No rating
This issue offers three articles covering diverse aspects of Illinois' history. In "Illinois Germans and the Coming of the Civil War: Reshaping Ethnic Identity," Christina Bearden-White uses German-language sources to examine the complex issue of German identity in the Prairie State during the mid-nineteenth century. Ian Rocksborough-Smith's article, "'I had gone in there thinking I was going to be a cultural worker': Richard Durham, Oscar Brown, Jr. and the United Packinghouse Workers Association in Chicago," presents a fascinating analysis of the Cold War-era careers of Oscar Brown, Jr. and Richard Durham, two prominent Chicago-based African American political activists. Finally, Michael Sublett's "Downstate: Illinois' Peripheral Other," presents the etymology of that well-known Prairie State term. Employing the categories of core and periphery, which rose to prominence in social science and historical writing during the 1970s, Sublett traces the evolution and application of the downstate moniker.
RSS
Terms Of UsePrivacy StatementCopyright 2018 by Illinois State Historical Society
Back To Top