Search
Monday, February 19, 2018

Newsroom

General News

September - October 2017

Gwen Podeschi 0 1011 Article rating: No rating
The coming of autumn conjures up memories of an America that
was and our connections to our state’s past. 
Visiting Shiloh Cemetery, the burial place of Thomas and Sarah Bush
Lincoln, leads to a reflection on the mortality of our ancestors, and
ultimately, to our own mortality.    Cemeteries are not so much a place to bury
the dead as they are a place where the once-living have finally settled down.  So it is with the stories passed down to us
over the years as we find our own way to pay tribute to the past by sharing the
tales in our turn.

Each of the 102 counties that make up Illinois has a wealth
of heritage to share with visitors and residents.  Whether we are selecting the perfect pumpkin
or biting into a crisp apple newly picked from the orchard, it is the time of
year when we can savor some of the harvest bounty of our state. 

With the September/October, 2017 Illinois Heritage embarks on a third decade of stories unique to
the Prairie State.  Share your Heritage.

Volume 110 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

Mark Hubbard 0 534 Article rating: No rating
VOLUME 110 NO. 2 OF THE JOURNAL opens with three studies that about events that dramatically shaped the state’s nearly two hundred year history. In Pocahontas, Uleleh, and Hononegah: The Archetype of the American Indian Princess, Dan Blumlo explores the trope of the Indian Princess– who intervenes at a crucial moment to save a white man from certain death at the hands of savage Indians– evolved and became central to nineteenth and twentieth century conceptions of American nationalism. In Jim Crow Comes to Central Illinois: Racial Segregation in the twentieth Century Bloomington-Normal, Mark Wyman and John W. Muirhead review the persistence of racial segregation in Illinois and the struggles of blacks and sympathetic whites to combat it. In our final article, The Decline of Decatur, longtime Illinois historian Roger Biles presents a timely account of what we today call globalization, and why its history matters so much to residents of countless Rustbelt cities like Decatur.

July - August 2017

Gwen Podeschi 0 1087 Article rating: No rating
Southern Illinois is the place to be this August as we anticipate a total solar eclipse, with center stage located over the state's first capital, Kaskaskia. Will two minutes and forty seconds of darkened skies start crickets chirping and bring out the fireflies? We'll just have to wait and see and hope for a cloudless day for the people planning to check out the path of totality. And we'll also have to wait and see whether our great state can come to terms with its budgetary woes and see brighter days ahead.

Welcome to Kristan McKinsey, Director of the Illinois Women Artists Project, as she picks up the excellent editorial work of the late Channy Lyons. Our friends at Illinois Humanities are forging ahead with plans for the upcoming state bicentennial and we can travel with Stephen Leonard and Keith Sculle on their road trip of discovery along the east-west Route 36 across Illinois.

Despite the quagmires of government, the quicksand of politics, and the mosquitoes of summer, Illinois is a glorious place to call home.

Society seeks donors to place iconic Lincoln portrait in state's county courthouses

Photo was taken in Springfield, June 3, 1860, after Lincoln won the Republican nomination for president

William Furry 0 0 Article rating: No rating
The Illinois State Historical Society is trying to place a large canvas photograph of Abraham Lincoln in every courthouse in Illinois. These 30" x 40" inch framed canvases (shown below) are the best photographic reproduction images of Lincoln as he looked in Illinois (without a beard) shortly after he received the national Republican Party nomination for president. The photo was taken by famed photographer Alexander Hesler in Springfield at the Old State Capitol on June 3, 1860, and was deemed by Lincoln to be his favorite likeness.

The framed canvas portraits are available ONLY from the Illinois State Historical Society, and it is our intention to place one in every Illinois courthouse in time for the bicentennial next December. Can you help us? The cost of a portrait of A. Lincoln is $500, plus tax (no tax is you're a member of the ISHS). For $25 we will deliver the canvas to the county courthouse of your choice.

Please allow two weeks for delivery, but order your Lincoln Hesler canvas today. Let's put Honest Abe in every Illinois courthouse for Illinois's 200th anniversary. For details or more information, call 217-525-2781 and ask for Gwen.
RSS
First6789101112131415Last
Terms Of UsePrivacy StatementCopyright 2018 by Illinois State Historical Society
Back To Top