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Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society

Volume 109 - Number 2 - Summer 2016

Mark Hubbard 0 2506 Article rating: No rating
The summer 2016 issue features three stimulating essays on mid-nineteenth century Illinois politics. In "Extradition, the Mormons, and the Election of 1843," Andrew H. Hedges offers a new interpretation of the Mormons' surprising support of Joseph P. Hoge, the 1843 Democratic candidate for U.S. representative in Illinois' sixth congressional district. That decision was fraught with enormous consequence. In the wake of the Mormon vote for the Democrat Hoge, the area's Whig Party turned against the religious group, a momentous shift in local attitudes that spawned conflict and eventual expulsion of the Mormons out of western Illinois.
Brent M. Rodgers examines another dimension of Mormon politics in Illinois in his "'Armed men are coming from the state of Missouri': Federalism, Interstate Affairs, and Joseph Smith's Final Attempt to Secure Federal Intervention in Nauvoo." Rogers examines the constitutional and political theory behind Joseph Smith's letter to President John Tyler, written just seven days before his murder, pleading for federal intervention in behalf of the beleaguered religionists at Nauvoo. 
In the issue's final article, "A Copperhead in Quincy Goes to Washington: Senator William A. Richardson," Shawn Hale adds to our knowledge and understanding of the Copperhead opposition that dogged Lincoln throughout the Civil War. Focusing on Richardson's many published speeches, Hale produces a refurbished and updated analysis of the Illinois Democrat's political thought. Richardson, argues Hale, is best seen as a "romantic conservative" whose commitment to the Constitution 'as it was' left him ill equipped in the face of revolutionary changes to federal authority and black freedom wrought by the Civil War.

Volume 109 - Number 1 - Spring 2016

Alex Hays 0 2766 Article rating: No rating

Articles

“How Newness Enters the World”: Cultural Creolization in Swedish-American Hymnals Published at Augustana College, 1901-1925
 - By Peter Ellertsen

Sacrificing for a “Just Cause”:
The World War I Memoir of Edward F. Paule, U.S. Engineers
 - By
Jeffrey L. Patrick

Moral Imperatives and Political Realities:
Edward Marciniak and the Fight to End Chicago’s Dual Housing Market
 -
By Charles Shanabruch

Volume 108 - Number 3-4 - Fall/Winter 2015

Shaggy 0 4538 Article rating: No rating
IN 1963, DURING THE HEIGHT of the Civil War centennial, the Illinois State Historical Society published a special issue of its journal to commemorate and celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The articles in the issue covered a wide range of topics related to African American history in Illinois up to the Civil War era. Although the ISHS had published articles on Illinois African American history through the years, a special issue devoted exclusively to the top was deemed appropriate.
As the sesquicentennial of both the Civil War and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment draws to a close, it is no less appropriate to devote a special issue of this journal to African American history in Illinois. In hist second inaugural address Lincoln said that all knew that slavery somehow was the cause of the Civil War. To commemorate and remember the war without discussing slavery and the broader questions of African American citizenship and participation in society would be wrong. And so, I am happy to present six outstanding articles covering a variety of topics on Illinois African American history.

Volume 108 - Number 2 - Summer 2015

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THE SUMMER ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL OFFERS three articles that examine key aspects of the Prairie State's Political history.

In "Elijah P. Lovejoy: Anti-Catholic Abolitionist," John Duerk examines the famous abolitionist's anti-Catholicism, which constituted a vital component of Lovejoy's larger worldview.

In "A Question of Loyalty: The 1896 Election in Quincy, Illinois," John Coats analyzes the election of 1896 at the grassroots. For decades political historians have viewed the election of 1896 as a "critical" election, marking the transition from the third to the fourth party system.

Finally, Richard Allen Morton's "It Was Bryan and Sullivan Who did the Trick': How William Jennings Bryan and Illinois' Roger C. Sullivan Brought About the Nomination of Woodrow Wilson in 1912," examines the backroom negotiations and on-floor machinations that produced Woodrow Wilson's nomination at the 1912 Democratic Party convention in Baltimore.

Volume 108 - Number 1 - Spring 2015

Shaggy 0 3358 Article rating: No rating
The present issue of the Journal takes us from the colorful din of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair to the bucolic downstate coal belt.

In "Types and Beauties: Evaluating the Exoticizing Women on the Midway Plaissand at the 1893 Columbian Exposition," Rachel Boyle traces the intersection of racial and gendered discourses in the representations of forgeign women published in suvenior books commemorating the World' Fair.

Lisa Cushing provides a fascinating article, "Hedgemony and Resistance at the World's Columbian Exposition: Simon Pokagon and The Red Man's Rebuke" situates a key moment at the Exposition - Chicago Day - in the ironic and often tragic history of ninteenth-century United State Indian policy. Which is a story of the city's birth and subsequent rise.

In "Strip Coal Mining and Reclamation in Fulton County, Illinois: An Environmental History", Greg Hall shifts the study of twentieth-century Illinois coal mining into the growing field of environmental history. Pushing beyond categories employed by social, economic and labor historians, Hall uses Fulton County as a case study in what an envonmental history of Illinois coal mining might look like.
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