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Friday, March 22, 2019

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September - October 2018

Volume 21, Number 5

Elaine Evans 0 966 Article rating: No rating
Nine months into the state's bicentennial year, the Illinois State Historical Society continues to make the commemoration as memorable as possible. So far this year we have placed or scheduled 71 Lincoln portraits in county courthouses around the state; eight historical marker dedications will be carried out between now and October 30; the Society's 2018 Centennial Awards will handed out on Saturday, November 3 at the newly restored Illinois Governor's Mansion, and our 2018 Illinois History Symposium is scheduled for December 3.

The Illinois Heritage magazine gives our members and friends a chance to share their deep passion for Prairie State history. This issue includes article from contributors all across the state: Herbert Russell from Carbondale; Kathleen Spaltro from Woodstock; Mark Flotow from Springfield; John Hallwas from Macomb; Reg Ankrom from Quincy; Will Shannon from Belleville; and Keith Sculle from Williamsville and Steve Leonard from Rochester. Each article will bring you closer to the essence of Illinois and, perhaps, stoke your own creative fires.

Thank you for reading Illinois Heritage. Your membership and gifts keep this organization vital and relevant. We cannot serve Illinois history without you. 

100 Most Valuable Documents at the Illinois State Archives: An Online Exhibit

Elaine Evans 0 697 Article rating: No rating
In honor of the Illinois bicentennial, Illinois State Archives staff has compiled a list of the 100 most valuable documents housed in its collection. The Illinois State Archives is the repository of all official Illinois government documents of permanent value. More than 75,000 cubic feet of paper, microfilm, photographs and audio and film recordings are housed in the Margaret Cross Norton Building on the capitol complex in Springfield. Paper records date back before 1818 statehood and include governors' correspondence, public acts, departmental histories, census records, military records, election results and more.

Illinois Humanities Announces Second Round of “Forgotten Illinois” Grants

Elaine Evans 0 485 Article rating: No rating
Illinois Humanities announced today the second round of grants as part of the “Forgotten Illinois” initiative, which is meant to help celebrate the Illinois Bicentennial in 2018 and to spark curiosity about Illinois history and its implications for our state’s present and future. The program is carried out in partnership with the Illinois State Historical Society.

Volume 111 - Number 1–2 - Spring/Summer 2018

Mark Hubbard 0 1026 Article rating: No rating
VOLUME 111 NO. 1-2 is our second consecutive double-issue commemorates Illinois’ 200th anniversary of state­hood. For those of us laboring in the historical profession and cognate fields—academically affiliated scholars and their students, unaffiliated scholars and researchers, public historians, museum professionals, archi­vists and librarians, and the like—anniversaries are moments to reflect upon disciplinary practice. They are, in other words, splendid occasions to reckon with the past, take stock of the present, and imagine the future. The last two major anniversaries of Illinois statehood—the centennial and sesquicentennial—produced landmark works of state history that collectively established the main contours of scholarship on the Prairie State well into the twentieth century. (These works, and our intellectual debts to them, are identified in the articles that follow.) The current issue of the Journal, “Illinois History: A Bicentennial Appraisal,” is offered in the same spirit. We seek to highlight the connections between the past—the history of this land called Illinois; the present—the current state of professional history about this land; and the future—how we might fruit­fully reframe and re-present this land’s history moving forward. The first six essays offer insightful sur­veys of recent trends in historical scholarship on Illinois from the colonial era to the very recent past. The historiographical essays mark the most important developments in historical scholarship on Illinois over the last thirty years or so, a necessary first-step in generating new research agendas and ultimately new narratives. The final two essays examine the practice of public history in Illinois, as it stands today. The cautionary les­sons learned from museum professionals and other practitioners of pub­lic history—declining public investments, conflicting political agendas, the growing role of local initiative, and most crucially, greater reliance on private resources—should alert us all to the need for an historical practice that informs, connects, and enriches diverse audiences and stakeholders.



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