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Welcome to the Illinois State Historical Sociey's online store. Over the years the Society has accumulated many books and since it is neither a research center nor a lending library, we have created this Store to make these books available for purchase. Most are single title items in like new condition. In addition to books, we are also offering for sale back issues of the Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society and Illinois Heritage, art work, and stationery. All proceeds from these sales will be used to support the Illinois State Historical Society.

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Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Vol. 112, No. 1, Spring 2019 -
Manufacturer: Illinois State Historical Society
Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Vol. 112, No. 1, Spring 2019

We open 2019 with three articles addressing murder, politics, and ethnoreligious identity in Illinois. In "Untouchable: Joseph Smith's Use of the Law as a Catalyst for Assassination," Alex Smith offers a fine-grained analysis of the Mormon prophet's understanding- and misunderstanding- of key legal concepts leading up to his murder at a Carthage, Illinois jail in 1844. The assassination of Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum has been, of course, the subject of a considerable historiography. Alex Smith Sees the Mormon prophet's use (and abuse, if contemporaries are to be taken at their word) of his legal powers as yet another key force driving the mob's anger that fateful day in Carthage.

 

Like the history of Joseph Smith and anti-mormonism, antislavery politics has generated a rich and variegated historiography. In "Free Soil, Free Labor, and Free Men: The Origins of the Republican Party in DuPage County, Illinois," Stephen Buck synthesizes many of the widely accepted explanations for the Republican Party's emergence in the 1850s, including the powerful ideal of free-soil in the trans-Mississippi West; opposition to the political clout of the "Slave Power" nationally; and genuine moral committments to the abolition of Slavery. DuPage COunty, in Buck's retelling, serves as a sort of case study in the steady growth of free-soil principles in northern Illinois beginning in the 1840s. Buck finds that by the time of the Lincoln-Douglas debates in 1858, the sectional crisis was so encompassing that it deeply inscribed party identification, even in elections to town and county offices. 

 

Always a city of immigrants, Chicago has rightfully served as a key focus for a wide-ranging body of scholarship on the immigrant experience in America. Oddly, however, the French, the first Europeans to se and settle the area, have largely faded from view in histories of immigrant Chicago. Daniel Snow sheds much needed light on the French-American experience in the Windy City in "Of Three Nations: Devotion and Community in French-American Chicago, 1850-1950." By practicing their Catholic faith in their new homeland, building voluntary associations, and mounting street festivals and parades, French immigrants to Chicago staked claims to visibility and citizenship, while synthesizing to tri-partite identity rooted in the distinctive cultural traditions of Old World France, French Quebec, and their newly adopted home in the United States.

Articles

"Untouchable: Joseph Smth's Use of the Law"
Alex D. Smith

"Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Origins of the Republican Party in DuPage County, Illinois"
Stephen J. Buck

"Of Three Nations: Devotion and Community in Frech-American Chicago, 1850-1950"
Daniel Snow

Review Essay

"Ungovernable Chicago?"
Gregory L. Schneider

Book Reviews

Prairie Defender: The Murder Trials of Abraham Lincoln. By George R. Dekle, Sr.
Reviewed by Eric Mogren

Free Spirits: Spritualism, Republicansim, Republicanism, and Radicalism in the Civil War. By Mark A. Lause.
Reviewed by Francesca Morgan

National Parks Beyond the Nation: Global Perspectives on "America's Best Idea." Edited by Adrian Howkins, Jared Orsi, and Mark Fiege
Reviewed by Paul Gulezian

From Warren Center to Ragged Edge: The Erosion of Midwestern Literary and Historical Regionalism, 1920-1965. By Jon K. Lauck 
Reviewed by Jeanne Gilliespie McDonald

Parish Crossings: Race, Sports, and Catholic Youth in Chicago, 1914-1954. By Timothy B. Neary.
Reviewed by Anthony O. Edmonds

Archibald Motley Jr., and Racial Reinvention: The Old Negro in New Negro Art. By Phoebe Wolfskill.
Reviewed by Jennifer Rose Hasso

The Chicago Freedon Movement: Martin Luther King Jr., and Civil Rights Activism in the North. Edited by Mary Lou Finlet, et. al. 
Reviewed by Anthony O. Edsmonds       

New Media Futures: The Rise of Women in the Digital Arts. Edited by Donna J. Cox, Ellen Sandor, and Jaime Fron.
Reviewed by TM.K. Draper

Dirt, Sweat, and Diesel: A Family Farm. By Steven L. Hilty.
Reviewed by Edward L. Bates

Cover

Thomas Sharp, editor of the Warsaw Signal. As published in Thomas Gregg, History of Hancock County, Illinois (Chicago: Charles C. Chapman & Co., 1880).

$18.00
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