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Monday, November 29, 2021

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Buckle of the Corn Belt: An Illustrated Tour of McLean County & Everyone's Favorite Grain

Event date: 11/20/2021 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Export event
Buckle of the Corn Belt: An Illustrated Tour of McLean County & Everyone's Favorite Grain
Elaine Evans
/ Categories: Events

Buckle of the Corn Belt: An Illustrated Tour of McLean County & Everyone's Favorite Grain

McLean County Museum of History

On Saturday, November 20 at 1:00 p.m., please join McLean County Museum’s Librarian, Bill Kemp, for a free, Zoom webinar that will explore the history of corn and how it has been a staple crop in what is today McLean County for the better part of a millennium. We'll be following the intertwined stories of corn and McLean County—from the corn-growing, mound-building Mississippians of the 13th century, to Funk Bros Seed Co. and the hybrid corn revolution of the 20th century.

Archaeological excavations tell us that corn has been grown in McLean County for at least 1,000 years. Today, acre-upon-acre of genetically modified corn represent the single defining characteristic of the county’s landscape. Kemp will lead participants through a mostly light-and-breezy tour of what corn has meant to McLean County. The most exciting part of the talk will be the dozens and dozens of informative, imaginative, wistful, and humorous illustrations and photographs covering topics such as the Corn Belt Bank, Bloomington's Corn Palace, corn painter Alfred Montgomery, the Corn Bowl, the Corn-On-the-Curb celebration, the Corn Crib ballpark, King Corn beer, and who knows what all. Perhaps we'll even get a look at a phantasmagorical Abraham Lincoln portrait made of corn.

Kemp promises a “corntacular” time for all.

To register for this free, Zoom webinar, visit https://bit.ly/MCMHCorn. For more information about this program, please contact the Education Department at education@mchistory.org or 309-827-0428.

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