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Tuesday, March 2, 2021

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Slavery

Illinois Heritage, January–February 2021

Volume 24, No, 1

Elaine Evans 0 200 Article rating: No rating

The Illinois State Historical Society has, for 121 winters, celebrated each new year with the promise of greater perspective, greater diversity, and the very best scholarship about our Prairie State’s past. We could not dream of a future without you, our members, making this journey with us. If you have not renewed your membership, please do so today. We need you.

This issue celebrates many fascinating aspects of our history, and our writers, board, and staff would love to know what you think of our efforts. Please send your email comments to executivedirector@historyillinois.org, and, with your permission, we will publish them in Illinois Heritage.

Thank you for your support, your perseverance during the late pandemic, and for your fortitude in these challenging times. Spring is coming, bringing the promise of unimaginable joy. Share your joy. Share your Heritage.

Illinois Heritage, September–October 2019

Volume 22, Number 5

Elaine Evans 0 1653 Article rating: No rating

The September–October issue of Illinois Heritage straddles a couple of centuries, with articles on the Constitutional Convention of 1870, Humanitarian Jane Addams, and the 1949 St. Anthony’s Hospital fire in Effingham. We jump forward and into the past with our interview with Leslie Goddard, an actor who interprets historical figures from three centuries. And we step outside the boundaries of Illinois for a ride on the riverboat Twilight, just to see our state from another point of view.

Thanks to all who have helped make this issue possible, contributors, donors, advertisers, letter writers, and readers. You’re the best. Share your Heritage!

Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Spring 2019

Volume 112 Number 1

Mark Hubbard 0 2383 Article rating: No rating

We open 2019 with three articles addressing murder, politics, and ethnoreligious identity in Illinois. In "Untouchable: Joseph Smith's Use of the Law as a Catalyst for Assassination," Alex Smith offers a fine-grained analysis of the Mormon prophet's understanding- and misunderstanding- of key legal concepts leading up to his murder at a Carthage, Illinois jail in 1844. 

Like the histroy of Joseph Smith and anti-mormonism, antislavery politics has generated a rich and variegated historiography. In "Free Soil, Free Labor, and Free Men: The Origins of the Republican Party in DuPage County, Illinois," Stephen Buck synthesizes many of the widely accepted explanations for the Republican Party's emergence in the 1850s, including the powerful ideal of free-soil in the trans-Mississippi West; opposition to the political clout of the "Slave Power" nationally; and genuine moral committments to the abolition of Slavery. 

Always a city of immigrants, Chicago has rightfully served as a key focus for a wide-ranging body of scholarship on the immigrant experience in America. Oddly, however, the French, the first Europeans to see and settle the area, have largely faded from view in histories of immigrant Chicago. Daniel Snow sheds much needed light on the French-American experience in the Windy City in "Of Three Nations: Devotion and Community in French-American Chicago, 1850-1950."

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