Search
Wednesday, May 29, 2024

Newsroom

Race Relations

Illinois Heritage, May–June 2023

Volume 26, Number 2

Elaine Evans 0 1508 Article rating: 5.0

In this issue we meet another Illinois woman artist, learn about another “Forgotten Voice from Illinois History,” are unsettled by the history of lynching in Illinois, and challenged to explore the stories of Illinoisans (Minnie Vautrin) whose courage under fire humbly inspires us to selfless acts of heroism. We also meet the recipients of this year’s “Best of Illinois History” awards, including Glennette Tilley Turner and Greg Koos, our remarkable Lifetime Achievement award winners, whose passion for truth-telling will be paying dividends to all of us for years to come.

The Heritage is published six times per year and is available as a benefit of membership in the Illinois State Historical Society. Individual editions can also be purchased by contacting our office directly. Visit our Membership section for membership options and information.

Click on the “Read More” button to see this issue’s Editor's Comments, Table of Contents, and sample articles.

Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Summer/Fall 2022

Volume 115, Numbers 2–3

Elaine Evans 0 2685 Article rating: 4.5

The Summer/Fall 2022 issue of the Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society is now available. The Journal, the scholarly publication of the ISHS, is published quarterly and is a benefit of membership in the Illinois State Historical Society. Each issue includes articles, essays, book reviews, and documents about history, literature, art technology, law, and other subjects related to Illinois and the Midwest. Visit our Membership page for membership options and information. Click on the “Read More” button to read this issue's Editor's Comments and see a list of articles and reviews included in this issue.

Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Fall 2019

Volume 112, Number 3

Elaine Evans 0 5660 Article rating: No rating

Our Fall 2019 issue brings together culture and commerce, in three distinctive contexts. In “Florenz Ziegfield and the Creation of a Cosmopolitan Chicago,” Susan E. Hirsch explores the rise of high culture–classical music, opera, theater, the fine arts–and its corresponding ethic of cosmopolitanism through the work of the German immigrant, Florenz Ziegfield. The talented classical pianist was one of Chicago’s busiest cultural entrepreneurs during the Gilded Age. 

The commercial opportunities presented by the variety of forms of popular entertainment in Chicago attracted figures less noble than the Ziegfields. In “When Chicago Went to the Dogs: Al Capone and Greyhound Racing in the Windy City, 1927-1933,” Steven A. Riess traces the fascinating history of Chicagoland dog racing and its deep connections to the city’s crime syndicates. 

Our final article traces the trajectory of racial attitudes and policies in an affluent Chicago suburb. In “Race, Town, and Gown: A White Christian College and a White Suburb Address Race,” Brian J. Miller and David B. Malone summarize the evolution of Wheaton College and the larger community of Wheaton, Illinois on matters of race. Before the Civil War both college and town were well-known for abolitionism and relatively enlightened racial views.

Illinois Heritage, July–August 2019

Volume 22, Number 4

Elaine Evans 0 11913 Article rating: 3.0

This issue of Illinois Heritage will fill the hours with Prairie State wonders. New contributor Mark Pohlad, an architectural historian from DePaul University, shares his thoughts on the 100th anniversary of the conveyance of New Salem to the State of Illinois. Kristan McKinsey serves up another out-standing profile in our long-running series on Illinois Women Artists. And Mark Flotow and his camera capture the Lincoln Days festival and Civil War “battle” on Lake Pittsfield, which took place over Memorial Day weekend in Pike County. But that’s not all.

ISHS Director William Shannon IV takes us to East St. Louis to remember a civil rights struggle in 1963, where African-American protestors challenged the community to level the playing field for jobs and to create equitable opportunities previously denied them. Last but never least, John Hallwas presents another “Forgotten Voices from Illinois History,” this time on a little-known publishing house that turned heads around the world toward Prairie City, Illinois.

Thank you for reading Illinois Heritage. Your membership and gifts keep this organization vital and relevant. We cannot serve Illinois history without you. 

RSS

Illinois State Historical Society   |   Strawbridge-Shepherd House   |   PO Box 1800   |   Springfield, IL 62705-1800

Terms Of UsePrivacy StatementCopyright 2024 by Illinois State Historical Society
Back To Top