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Tuesday, September 29, 2020

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Civil War

Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Spring 2020

Volume 113, Number 1

Elaine Evans 0 331 Article rating: No rating

The Spring 2020 issue of the Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society is printed and should be arriving to members’ mailboxes in the next few days. The Journal, the scholarly publication of the ISHS, is published quarterly and is a benefit of membership in the Illinois State Historical Society. Each issue includes articles, essays, book reviews, and documents about history, literature, art technology, law, and other subjects related to Illinois and the Midwest. Visit our Membership option under the "Support Us" tab for membership options and information. Click on the “Read More” button for a list of articles and reviews included in this issue.

Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Winter 2019

Volume 112, Number 4

Elaine Evans 0 1502 Article rating: No rating

We close 2019 with three outstanding scholarly contributions to Illinois history. In “Getting to ‘Lake Michigan’: a 350-year Onomastic Odyssey,” Michael McCafferty, a linguist at Indiana University Bloomington, explores the origins of the placename, “Michigan.” While popular translations have long affixed the meaning “big water” to the placename “Michigan,” McCafferty finds that this myth is not supported in the linguistic evidence.

In “A Writer of More Than Usual Charm: The Dynamic Influence of Dr. Milo Milton Quaife and Harriet Martineau on Juliette Magill Kinzie’s Contributions to American Frontier Literature,” literary historian Franklin E. Court traces Quaife’s influence in both elevating Kinzie to, and preserving her place in, the canon of early nineteenth century American frontier literature.

In “Sorrow Comes to All: Bloomington, Illinois’s Demonstration of Community Participation in Civil War Grief,” Megan VanGorder explores the rituals and practices surrounding death and grief in the Civil War.

Illinois Heritage, July–August 2019

Volume 22, Number 4

Elaine Evans 0 1298 Article rating: 3.0

This issue of Illinois Heritage will fill the hours with Prairie State wonders. New contributor Mark Pohlad, an architectural historian from DePaul University, shares his thoughts on the 100th anniversary of the conveyance of New Salem to the State of Illinois. Kristan McKinsey serves up another out-standing profile in our long-running series on Illinois Women Artists. And Mark Flotow and his camera capture the Lincoln Days festival and Civil War “battle” on Lake Pittsfield, which took place over Memorial Day weekend in Pike County. But that’s not all.

ISHS Director William Shannon IV takes us to East St. Louis to remember a civil rights struggle in 1963, where African-American protestors challenged the community to level the playing field for jobs and to create equitable opportunities previously denied them. Last but never least, John Hallwas presents another “Forgotten Voices from Illinois History,” this time on a little-known publishing house that turned heads around the world toward Prairie City, Illinois.

Thank you for reading Illinois Heritage. Your membership and gifts keep this organization vital and relevant. We cannot serve Illinois history without you. 

Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Spring/Summer 2018

Volume 111, Number 1-2

Mark Hubbard 0 2958 Article rating: No rating

Volume 111, No. 1-2 is our second consecutive double-issue commemorates Illinois’ 200th anniversary of state­hood. For those of us laboring in the historical profession and cognate fields—academically affiliated scholars and their students, unaffiliated scholars and researchers, public historians, museum professionals, archi­vists and librarians, and the like—anniversaries are moments to reflect upon disciplinary practice. They are, in other words, splendid occasions to reckon with the past, take stock of the present, and imagine the future. The last two major anniversaries of Illinois statehood—the centennial and sesquicentennial—produced landmark works of state history that collectively established the main contours of scholarship on the Prairie State well into the twentieth century. (These works, and our intellectual debts to them, are identified in the articles that follow.) The current issue of the Journal, “Illinois History: A Bicentennial Appraisal,” is offered in the same spirit. We seek to highlight the connections between the past—the history of this land called Illinois; the present—the current state of professional history about this land; and the future—how we might fruit­fully reframe and re-present this land’s history moving forward.

The first six essays offer insightful sur­veys of recent trends in historical scholarship on Illinois from the colonial era to the very recent past. The historiographical essays mark the most important developments in historical scholarship on Illinois over the last thirty years or so, a necessary first-step in generating new research agendas and ultimately new narratives. The final two essays examine the practice of public history in Illinois, as it stands today. The cautionary les­sons learned from museum professionals and other practitioners of pub­lic history—declining public investments, conflicting political agendas, the growing role of local initiative, and most crucially, greater reliance on private resources—should alert us all to the need for an historical practice that informs, connects, and enriches diverse audiences and stakeholders.


 

Illinois Heritage, January–February 2018

Volume 21, Number 1

Gwen Podeschi 0 3625 Article rating: No rating

The January-February 2018, issue of Illinois Heritage invites its readers to celebrate the state’s bicentennial.  Adventures around the Prairie State take us on a veritable road trip around the state without leaving our hearth.  Art and literature are celebrated with a look a Pulitzer Prize-winning authors Carl and Mark Van
Doren and the art of Irma Rene Koen. Traveling the state with authors Stephen Leonard and Keith Sculle will surely jog a reader’s memory of their own trips.  Finally, be sure not to miss our state’s bicentennial time travel in the first installment of “Illinois in Time.” 

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